product details

Carbon Offset Forestry

Carbon Offsets—Improved Forest Management

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By purchasing Improved Forest Management Carbon Offsets you can balance your unavoidable household carbon footprint while supporting sustainable forest management practices that improve water quality and habitat for wildlife. These projects help permanently protect forests from fragmentation, development and conversion to non-forest uses.

One Carbon Offset represents the reduction of greenhouse gases equivalent to one metric ton (or 2,205 pounds) of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e). Your purchase, combined with that of other BEF partners, represents a significant funding source that helps ensure continued innovation and development of carbon reduction projects and technology.

where we get it

This product contains a blend of Carbon Offsets from our portfolio of forestry projects

View project portfolio ::

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$12.00 $0.00
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Collectively, BEF and its partners have kept more than 3.8 million metric tons of harmful CO2e from the atmosphere through our partners’ purchase of Carbon Offsets. That’s the equivalent of taking more than 795,000 cars off the road for one year.

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how carbon offsets work

Carbon Offsets are generated by discrete carbon reduction projects. One Carbon Offset represents the reduction of 1 metric ton (or 2,205 pounds) of greenhouse gas emissions that occur as a result of that specific project. Each Carbon Offset generated is third-party verified to prove that real, additional, permanent, verifiable and enforceable emissions reductions have occurred. On top of their direct environmental benefit, some Carbon Offset projects carry additional certification to provide measurable social benefits as well.

1 carbon offset = 1 metric ton of CO2e kept from the atmosphere

VERIFICATION STANDARDS—Each Carbon Offset generated is third-party verified to prove that real, permanent, verifiable, additional and enforceable emissions reductions have occurred.

PROOF OF PURCHASE—BEF provides you with a proof of purchase certificate by email to ensure that only you own the environmental attributes associated with your Carbon Offset and to confirm the project supply from which your Carbon Offset was generated.

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types of carbon offset projects

The project types described below represent the diversity of projects that could make up BEF's Carbon Offset portfolio. They are provided as information only to help inform our customers about where and how Carbon Offsets are generated. View our current project portfolio online now ::

AGRICULTURE METHANE CAPTURE—Agricultural operations, such as those in the dairy industry, result in methane emissions from animal waste. Sites may capture and flare the methane, which converts it into much less potent carbon dioxide. The methane gas may also be collected and scrubbed for use as biogas to produce energy, sometimes replacing natural gas or other fuel oils used for heating or energy production. The greenhouse gas (GHG) value is a function of converting the methane into carbon dioxide, which traps less heat in the atmosphere than methane.

CAMPUS CLEAN ENERGY—Institutions of higher education across the U.S. are engaged in reducing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a variety of strategies including energy efficiency upgrades, on-site renewable energy and behavior change to reduce energy use. Carbon Offsets from this sector follow a performance-based approach and result from measured year-over-year improvements in energy use from either an entire campus or an individual certified green building located on campus.

FORESTRY—Healthy forests absorb and hold carbon dioxide emissions produced from other sources and are an important source of greenhouse gas (GHG) sequestration. Carbon offsets from forestry may be created through a variety of strategies including: avoided deforestation and permanent land conservation, reforestation and replanting activities and improved forest management and stewardship in working forests where harvesting occurs.

GRASSLANDS CONSERVATION—Similar to forestry, native grasses and other vegetation provide a natural source of greenhouse gas (GHG) absorption and sequestration. Carbon Offsets from this category focus on maintaining native plant life through permanent land conservation and avoided conversion for commercial development or agriculture.

IMPROVED FOREST MANAGEMENT—Improved forest management focuses on long-term, sustainable forest management practices to ensure that forests continue to remove CO2 from the atmosphere since deforestation accounts for between 15 and 20% of global carbon emissions. Improved forest management activities include tending, thinning out, felling, regeneration and planting and fertilization to enable productive and sustainable forest growth.

LANDFILL GAS EXTRACTION—Unregulated landfill operations may collect and convert the methane emissions occurring as solid wastes break down at their facility over time. Methane gas may be flared and converted to carbon dioxide in order to significantly reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) potency. The methane gas may also be collected and scrubbed for use as biogas to produce energy, sometimes replacing natural gas or other fuel oils used for heating or energy production. The GHG value is a function of converting the methane into carbon dioxide, which traps less heat in the atmosphere than methane.

NATURALLY OCCURRING METHANE CAPTURE—Methane emissions may occur from land areas where coal or other high concentrations of un-extracted fossil fuels are present underground, resulting in a naturally occurring source of GHG emissions. Methane gas may be flared and converted to carbon dioxide in order to significantly reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) potency. The methane gas may also be collected and scrubbed for use as biogas to produce energy, sometimes replacing natural gas or other fuel oils used for heating or energy production. The GHG value is a function of converting the methane into carbon dioxide, which traps less heat in the atmosphere than methane.

REFRIGERANT LEAK PREVENTION—This type of project quantifies the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reductions generated by reducing hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant leaks commonly found in commercial refrigeration systems. Rather than rely on annual equipment inspection for leak detection, this strategy utilizes automated infrared detection systems to identify issues when they occur and allows for immediate response. This results in a significant reduction in HFC emissions escaping through refrigerant equipment failure. Like methane, HFCs are a far more potent greenhouse gas (greater warming potential) than carbon dioxide, so it’s essential to prevent their release into the atmosphere.

RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION—Renewable energy facilities, such as wind or solar, generate Carbon Offsets through displacing fossil fuel-based electricity production sources within the power grid. The greenhouse gas (GHG) value of this activity depends on the composition of the electricity mix within the grid region where the renewable energy facility is located.

TRANSPORTATION EFFICIENCY—Carbon Offsets from the transportation sector primarily focus on reducing emissions resulting from gasoline or diesel fuel used in fleet trucking operations. The two key strategies include truck idle reduction (where not required by law) such as with a truck-stop electrification project and efficiency upgrades to trucking equipment in order to improve fuel economy above prevailing regulated standards. In each case, reduced fuel consumption results in a reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions attributable to the strategy deployed.

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what’s in your carbon footprint?

HOME—The average U.S. home uses 10,837 kilowatt-hours of electricity annually to power our appliances and electronics. Depending on your geographical region and your local utility’s resource mix, your electricity use can represent up to 33% of your carbon footprint.

DRIVING— The average American passenger vehicle travels 11,493 miles a year, which is equivalent to the release of approximately 10,582 pounds of CO2e emissions into the atmosphere annually.

AIR TRAVEL—A 3,500 mile flight (such as from Los Angeles to Chicago, round trip) produces approximately 2,275 pounds of CO2e when accounting for radiative forcing.

WHAT YOU BUY—Everything you purchase and use has a carbon footprint determined by a wide range of factors including how and where it was produced, the materials it was made from, and the lifecycle of the product.

WHAT YOU EAT/DRINK—Everything in your diet has a carbon footprint, made up of many factors, including the product itself, how it is grown or produced, the associated waste and/or methane released during its production, transportation associated with getting the product to your plate, and its product lifecycle. Generally plant-based foods have a lower carbon footprint than animal-based. Meat and animal by-products are the largest contributors to your dietary carbon footprint.

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how to shrink your footprint…

GET EFFICIENT—Ready to replace appliances and/or heating and cooling equipment at home? Shop for those with the EPA’s Energy Star label. Over their lifetime, products in your home that have earned the ENERGY STAR label can reduce greenhouse gas emissions by about 130,000 pounds.

CHANGE 5 LIGHTS—Change your 5 most frequently used light fixtures to ENERGY STAR qualified lightbulbs, which generate about 75% less heat and use about 75% less energy.

BUY LOCAL, RECYCLED AND/OR UPCYCLED—Be conscious of what you buy and where you buy it. Choose recycled or upcycled options where available, and buy local to reduce your footprint and support your local economy at the same time.

DRIVE SMART—Combine short trips under 5 miles to reduce your driving emissions. Take public or shared transportation wherever possible. Check your tire pressure regularly as under-inflation increases tire wear, reduces your fuel economy, and leads to higher greenhouse gas and other air pollutant emissions.

EAT CONSCIOUSLY—Meat and animal by-products are the largest contributors to your dietary carbon footprint. Consider eating meat just one day less a week or choosing other plant-based foods instead. Eat locally and in-season to reduce your emissions associated with transporting food.

BUY GREEN POWER—You can mitigate the environmental impacts of your utility’s resource mix and support renewable energy by enrolling in your utility’s green power program.

BUY CARBON OFFSETS—BEF’s verified Carbon Offsets let you balance the carbon footprint you can’t avoid. Every Carbon Offset you purchase represents 1 metric ton (or 2,205 pounds) of Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (CO2e) that is kept from the atmosphere.

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references

Refrigerant leak prevention; Carbon footprint of meat; Auto miles emissions; Electricity and energy use by household; Air travel; Shrinking your home footprint; Shrinking your footprint on the road